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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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  • Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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    Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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    Patients have played a consistent key role in training on the Shared Haemodialysis Care course since its inception in 2011. The patient presenter has influenced staff perceptions of care by providing a view of haemodialysis through an alternative lens. I felt I might have been able to help other patients moving forward by helping staff see treatment for a patient's point of view Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Patient involvement Empathy is known to be a key component of a therapeutic relationship, Rogers (1957). By listening and exploring how patients feel, nurses develop empathy and are motivated to make changes to improve the patient experience. When a group of interested patients was invited to attend the course study days as inclusive participants in contrast to guest presenters in 2020, we had an opportunity to work as one cohesive group. This was a unique experience and one that set the scene for stretching traditional patient/staff boundary roles. I believe that you need to recognise that these aren't just patients, but people with feelings who need to be given a voice and listened to. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark To be able to work with staff was great instead of just going to a unit where they are there to treat you. We had the time to really listen to each other. I found it very interesting that I could get together with some other renal patients and dialysis staff and talk about things from both patient and staff perspective. I feel like we all got a lot out of the course as one whole group of people. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Working as a team with a wide range of experiences, expertise and views resulted in rich learning. Along with the benefits of hearing directly from the patient experts it also presented challenges when working beyond what would be considered as 'normal' for staff.  Watching the response from the staff and listening to them converse with patients was great. It is so important to listen to the patients and know how they feel.I noticed a few members of staff felt they could not express themselves enough in case it upset the patients. Staff Facilitator: Vicki Ness Creating resources to benefit other patients During the study days on the Shared Care course early in 2020, time was set aside for the attending patients to work on the Shared Care poster project. The content of the poster 'By patients- For patients' was a result of learning from conversations and discussions with patients and staff both on the study days and through homework staff were given which involved asking what their patients thought. With all of us having different journeys through renal failure we were able to draw on different experiences to help really get the right message across. We were also fortunate enough to have the input from many nurses during the meetings. Expert Patient: Peter Gill It was relaxed and fun working with other patients, sharing our own personal experiences and knowledge. It is important to involve patients as we are the ones who this is aimed at so know what we want to see and the information we need to hear. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark The Design Challenge  The shared vision of the patient group was to create a resource that would encourage other patients to get involved in Shared Haemodialysis Care. "We wanted to design it in such a way that was not complicated yet spoke a thousand words, to reflect our journeys and positivity. We finally agreed on something that represented personal development, strength, uniqueness and beauty. Striving for greater knowledge, wisdom and new experiences, The Tree of Life! This encompassed all that Shared Care represented.It was important that we did not over complicate the poster because people would not engage with it. We wanted to make it appealing and easy to understand. We decided instead of leaves we wanted hands with the tasks written inside them. The hand was to represent either the patient's or nurse's hand. Alongside the nurse we wanted a small banner which displayed the words home haemodialysis; this was the recognition of progression if desirable.Another important thing we wanted to include on the poster were the benefits gained by partaking in some level of Shared Care. We felt that these desirables we overlooked and not known by many patients and by adding them to the poster, patients could see just exactly how rewarding it could be.We know how daunting and overwhelming it may feel but by working as a team your whole outlook and perspective will change and be far more positive" - Expert Patient Colette Acosta The patient group had clear objectives to use the final poster to support their own home units' Shared Care programmes but also to provide a resource that would demonstrate the impact of patient involvement in its design. I am hoping that the poster will help at Salford by showing that patients are involved within shared care and that the staff are taking notice of our first-hand knowledge. Expert Patient: Daniel Clarke I feel that the poster will help both patients and staff see the difference doing any sort of shared care. It's not as daunting as it may first seem. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Our hopes are that it will encourage more patients to get involved with Shared Care Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Making a difference Working 'with patients, for patients' is a rewarding experience for staff and patients alike. I have been in my role training patients aspects of shared care for 8 years now and it has developed from just training to more involvement in other things such as promoting and helping patients understand the benefits. I find my role very rewarding and as a patient I can empathise with the patients and understand how they may feel. We have found having a patient involved in shared care can help ease the fear and anxiety some patients may have and that it has helped some patients who were refusing to take part, rethink and get involved. One of the things I tend to notice is that some patients are more open to listening to someone who has first-hand experience of what they are dealing with which opens the door to listen to information regarding shared care. Being involved is nothing but positive. Expert Patient: Daniel Clark Involving patients as experts has influenced how staff listen to their patients which has resulted in stronger partnerships. Just as importantly it has benefited the patients who have facilitated this process.  We felt we wanted to give something back after the time, money and patience spent on us, and to also feel like we had a purpose. Expert Patient: Colette Acosta Telling my story and it being taken on board by the staff made a difference to my well-being. Expert Patient: Sarah Eales Please download the poster and display it to support your own Shared Care programmes. It is important that it remains unedited but don't let that stop you from getting your own patients involved in other similar initiatives. pdf File Name: Shared-Care-Poster-FINAL-print-version File Size: 6 mb Download File Download PDF File Here Rogers, C. (1957) The necessary and sufficient conditions for therapeutic personality change. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 95-103. DOI:10.1037/0022-006X.60.6.827 
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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    Harry's Story
    •   News
    •   Friday, 28 February 2020
    Kidney failure, a condition many people are unaware of, a condition I have had to become very aware of the past few years. My mam was diagnosed with kidney reflux disease at age 5, which later on in life developed into kidney failure. She has now been in kidney failure for 6 years, knowing that my own mam goes through the struggles of being exhausted every day and having to constantly worry about what she eats and how much she drinks and sitting there 3 hours a day 4 days a week makes me feel guilty. Makes me feel guilty that it's happening to her one of the sweetest most loving human beings on the earth.However it's the situation she has been put in so even though it's not exactly ideal it gives me a sense of comfort that she is able to dialysis in the comfort of her own home surrounded by the people she loves.I feel like she does a lot better now that she'sat home she's a lot more confident in herself she's back to being that fun energetic mother and friend that always been with her but went to sleep when life didn't look up for her. Kidney failure will never be her biggest weakness it is and will always be her biggest strength.And this is my view on Kidney failure. Obtained via Vicki Ness, Shared Care/HHD Assistant Practitioner at James Cook Hospital Middlesborough SouthTees, 11/19 ​
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  • Tania Barnes created a new blog post, Harry's Story
    Harry's Story
    •   News
    •   Friday, 28 February 2020
    Kidney failure, a condition many people are unaware of, a condition I have had to become very aware of the past few years. My mam was diagnosed with kidney reflux disease at age 5, which later on in life developed into kidney failure. She has now been in kidney failure for 6 years, knowing that my own mam goes through the struggles of being exhausted every day and having to constantly worry about what she eats and how much she drinks and sitting there 3 hours a day 4 days a week makes me feel guilty. Makes me feel guilty that it's happening to her one of the sweetest most loving human beings on the earth.However it's the situation she has been put in so even though it's not exactly ideal it gives me a sense of comfort that she is able to dialysis in the comfort of her own home surrounded by the people she loves.I feel like she does a lot better now that she'sat home she's a lot more confident in herself she's back to being that fun energetic mother and friend that always been with her but went to sleep when life didn't look up for her. Kidney failure will never be her biggest weakness it is and will always be her biggest strength.And this is my view on Kidney failure. Obtained via Vicki Ness, Shared Care/HHD Assistant Practitioner at James Cook Hospital Middlesborough SouthTees, 11/19 ​
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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    Harry's Story
    •   News
    •   Friday, 28 February 2020
    Kidney failure, a condition many people are unaware of, a condition I have had to become very aware of the past few years. My mam was diagnosed with kidney reflux disease at age 5, which later on in life developed into kidney failure. She has now been in kidney failure for 6 years, knowing that my own mam goes through the struggles of being exhausted every day and having to constantly worry about what she eats and how much she drinks and sitting there 3 hours a day 4 days a week makes me feel guilty. Makes me feel guilty that it's happening to her one of the sweetest most loving human beings on the earth.However it's the situation she has been put in so even though it's not exactly ideal it gives me a sense of comfort that she is able to dialysis in the comfort of her own home surrounded by the people she loves.I feel like she does a lot better now that she'sat home she's a lot more confident in herself she's back to being that fun energetic mother and friend that always been with her but went to sleep when life didn't look up for her. Kidney failure will never be her biggest weakness it is and will always be her biggest strength.And this is my view on Kidney failure. Obtained via Vicki Ness, Shared Care/HHD Assistant Practitioner at James Cook Hospital Middlesborough SouthTees, 11/19 ​
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  • Tania Barnes updated a blog post
    The first Shared Haemodialysis Care Course began in September 2011, designed by Renal Matrons Melind...
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    The first Shared Haemodialysis Care Course began in September 2011, designed by Renal Matrons Melind...
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    The first Shared Haemodialysis Care Course began in September 2011, designed by Renal Matrons Melind...
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  • The What, Why & How of Shared Haemodialysis Care - the one day overview for Managers.Following the success of our pilot day on July 18th hosted by Baxter in Reading, we will be running a second day on November 29th 2017 hosted this time by BBraun in Sheffield.Please email Tania.barnes@sth.nhs.uk if you are interested in attending. QUOTES from delegates attending the study day:I would recommend this day to others because…  "All managers need to be on board with this to filter information to their staff and implement programmes in their units.  Excellent day!" by Author "It highlights why we need to lead the Shared Care movement and provide support for patients and staff" by Author "It is a day of shared learning and very useful information" by Author stdClass Object ( [uid] => 08119291122322467 [type] => image [html] => [data] => stdClass Object ( [isurl] => [url] => files/articles/133/ManagersCourseDavidandCo.jpg [uri] => post:133/ManagersCourseDavidandCo.jpg [variation] => system/original [size_enabled] => 1 [mode] => simple [mode_lock] => [fluid] => [width] => [width_lock] => [height] => [height_lock] => [ratio] => [ratio_lock] => 1 [alignment] => center [responsive] => 1 [strategy] => fit [element_width] => [element_height] => [element_top] => [element_left] => [element_ratio] => [element_ratio_lock] => 1 [natural_width] => 203 [natural_height] => 270 [natural_ratio] => [style_enabled] => 1 [style] => clear [caption_enabled] => 1 [caption_text] => [alt_enabled] => 1 [alt_text] => [link_enabled] => 1 [link_url] => [link_title] => [link_target] => [popup_enabled] => 1 [popup_url] => [popup_uri] => [popup_variation] => [custom_css] => ) [blocks] => Array ( ) [nested] => [isolated] => [style] => text-align: center; [text] => undefined [editableHtml] => ) 1   Download PDF File Here
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  • Tania Barnes created a new blog post, A Staff Member's Story
    A Staff Member's Story
    A health care worker tells their story of first encountering Shared Care. I looked upon shared care with a very negative attitude when I first heard about it. I didn't want to take part or know anything about it. It would not work! It will be a waste of time me learning it. So I avoided it. I also felt left out because only certain staff appeared to be privy to what was happening, so I had the attitude of well if they can't tell me, then I don't want to knowAfter we started shared care in one bay, the bay became a no go area! For staff that didn't know or didn't regularly in that area. I certainly didn't want to work in there. I didn't know how to train a patient to care for themselves. The bay was also developing Button hole needle sites which is the complete opposite of what I had been taught for 15 years of my working life. I felt like an outsider when I was placed in this bay to work. In working life we have to do things on a professional basis and just GET ON WITH IT. I tried my best.I slowly learned the Button hole technique but still found allowing patients to share my work difficult and time consuming. Eventually I was asked if I wanted to attend the study days all about shared care. I thought oh finally I might get to know a bit more and still not think it was a good thing, but at least I could make an informed decision. It did not happen that way.I was not dragged kicking and screaming, we had a mini bus to take a group of us to Leeds (an adventure day out) We had different speakers of varying backgrounds. We had a patient that did shared care. He talked to us about his experiences and how shared care had improved his health and made his illness his and bearable. We had homework to do with our patients when we got back to the unit. This homework along with the 3 study days and working with patients who are in shared care has completely turned me around. To see the difference it makes to a person to be allowed to do as much or as little toward their care is quite astonishing. You see confusion, happiness, pride and better health in these patients. I feel pride and feel wanted in my workplace now. I freely speak to staff and patients about shared care.I can tell you all proudly that I was a non-believer but now I believe. I hope everyone has the experience I have had and that I can continue to work well with both my shared care patients and my non shared care patients, as they are both equally as important in my unit. 
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  • A project designed to help patients on haemodialysis (HD) has been selected to be part of The Health Foundation's £3.5 million Scaling Up Improvement programme. The project is led by a team at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in collaboration with partners including Kidney Research UK.The Scaling Up Improvement programme is supporting seven health care projects in the UK with the aim to improve health care delivery and/or the way people manage their own care through the delivery of successful health care improvement interventions at a larger scale.The Shared Haemodialysis Care project seeks to improve the quality of life and outlook of patients on haemodialysis (HD) by supporting them to become more independent in managing their own dialysis. Nurses help patients learn how to perform a series of treatment related tasks associated with HD, such as preparing equipment, measuring weight and blood pressure and self-cannulation. Patients take on as many of these tasks as they feel comfortable with. Patients involved in the project have become more confident, and reported better psychological and physical outcomes. The associated increase in home-based dialysis during this period during this period has resulted in an estimated saving of £1.2m to the NHS over the last five years."From just turning up and being dialysed to participating in the Shared Haemodialysis Care project meant I felt in more control of my condition and it gave me my confidence back as well as teaching me more about my condition and my medications," said Mike May, a patient from Yorkshire & Humberside involved in the original project. "Once fully trained and doing my own treatments the Shared Haemodialysis Care project enabled me to be more independent, as well as giving me a certain amount of freedom with my dialysis sessions. In addition, I understood my blood results more which helped me make my own decisions, and I was happier in myself."Over the course of the programme the Shared Haemodialysis Care Scaling Up project team will take the approaches that have been tested at a small scale in the Yorkshire and Humberside area and deliver them at a larger scale, across 12 renal units across the country.Project lead Professor Martin Wilkie, from Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said, "We are delighted that more HD patients will have the opportunity to take a greater role in their own care through our empowering project, thanks to the funding from the Health Foundation. Through this intervention we intend to deliver not only the best outcomes for patients, but also to utilise health care resources as effectively as possible, in partnership with a number of leading organisations."The programme will run for two and a half years and will receive up to £500,000 of funding to support the implementation and evaluation of the work.Sarah Henderson, Associate Director from the Health Foundation said: "We are very excited to be working with these seven outstanding project teams who have been selected because of their expertise in scaling complex improvement projects, and their ambition to achieve real impact through improving the quality of care."Together, as part of the Scaling Up programme, we will aim to make lasting and sustained improvements to health care by testing out proven ideas at a large scale. We hope that this programme will result in these interventions being widely adopted across the UK." Professor Martin Wilkie and team will be working with a wide range of organisations to deliver the project, including 12 NHS trusts and patient charities.Kidney Research UK is supporting the delivery using its experience in patient engagement and advisory support, communications and in scaling-up programmes across the UK, gained from projects such as ASSIST CKD (which is also supported by a grant from the Health Foundation and maps data from routine blood tests to detect patients with the early signs of progressive kidney damage) across 20 centres."We are delighted to be working with Professor Martin Wilkie and the rest of the Sheffield team to improve the quality of life and care for more patients across more sites," said Michael Nation, Director of Development for Kidney Research UK. "We will be using our experience and learnings from other improvement projects as our goal as a research charity is to ensure that the best evidence translates into real and sustainable patient benefit. We want shared HD care to become the norm across all dialysis centres." 
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  • Tania Barnes created a new blog post, Michael's Story
    Michael's Story
    Home dialysis patient Michael discusses how Shared Care has helped give him a better quality of life Hello, my name is Michael Winfrow. I used to be an inpatient having hospital dialysis on the Peter Moorhead unit but now I am a home dialysis patient. I would just like to tell you a little about my journey through dialysis then Shared Care and how Shared Care helped to give me a better quality of life.I came into dialysis knowing very little about it, in fact I knew nothing only that it removed the toxins from you blood. So I just lay there very still letting people do everything for me thinking the whole process very technical. After a few visits to the dialysis unit I did notice that a man who came and sat with his wife while she had dialysis and he kept taking her blood pressure. I just thought he was probably an interfering visitor and staff thought he was doing no harm so just left him alone. No one else in my bay did anything, they all just lay there watching TV trying to make the 4 hours pass by the best they could.Then one day after about seven or eight visits, one of the staff, in fact it was the lady who brought round the sandwiches, said that there was a process called Shared Care and that it may suit me. I said "What's that?" and she said "Its where you do parts of your treatment for yourself." I thought how can I help myself, the whole process looks very technical? But they brought me a book and in this book, everything was set out in very easy stages. So I started by learning hygiene, washing hands etc., then I would go to stores get my needles and syringes. Then I learned how to program my dialysis machine, line it and connect it to the saline and prepare it ready for dialysis. Everything you do is checked by the nurses before dialysis begins so you are not worried you may harm yourself.Then came the part where I had to put my needles in. I had always wanted to be a home patient and knew one day I would have to put my needles in but whenever I talked to family and friends about it they just said "I don't know how you can" and so I wouldn't do it. My wife offered to put in my needles but keeping in her good books would have been an even bigger challenge! Then one day a nurse said "Come on, you have to do it one day, so do it now" and so I did. For a while, I had blood spurting everywhere. As I got better, it only ran down my arm! I think you are always going to be nervous about sticking a needle into your arm but it gets better as time goes by.So, would Shared Care suit everyone, old and young? Yes, I think it would because you don't have to do everything. You only do the tasks you feel capable of doing. Secondly, some people may just want to fetch their needles and syringes and prepare their dialysis packs. I always think people feel better about themselves when they are helping others. So, you come onto the unit, you look around and the nursing staff seem so busy with four patients walking in at once. If you can do a little to help yourself and then this makes you feel better about yourself, you feel more respected and your quality of life starts to improve.Thirdly and the most important, Shared Care gave me the confidence to start home dialysis training. After about 20 weeks, I went onto the home training programme and now I have my dialysis at home on the day I want and at the time I want giving me more freedom to do the things I want to do when I want to do them. I am now not saying "Sorry I cannot come out as I have to go to hospital for dialysis. I just put my dialysis off till later in the day or have it earlier. This leads to a better quality of life for me and my family.So what are the bad points? I thought long and hard about this and there are no bad points really as patients only have to do what they feel confident and comfortable doing. So if you only want to fetch your needles and syringes, that's ok. There is no pressure to make you try to perform tasks that you feel uncomfortable doing.So, back to the interfering patient. He was helping his wife with her dialysis and this must have made him feel good about himself. She must have been pleased he was making an effort to help her. So Shared Care helped them have more respect for each other leading to them having a better quality of life.
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  • Shared Care Course Receives BKPA Grant
    •   News
    •   Thursday, 26 January 2017
    The Shared Haemodialysis Care Course has received a 2-year funding grant from the British Kidney Patient Association, which will allow the course to continue as free for participants. stdClass Object ( [uid] => 03939859046940821 [type] => image [html] => [data] => stdClass Object ( [isurl] => [url] => //www.shareddialysis-care.org.uk/images/articles/21/BKPA.png [uri] => post:21/BKPA.png [variation] => system/original [size_enabled] => 1 [mode] => simple [mode_lock] => [fluid] => [width] => 125 [width_lock] => [height] => [height_lock] => [ratio] => [ratio_lock] => 1 [alignment] => right [responsive] => 1 [strategy] => fit [element_width] => 125 [element_height] => [element_top] => [element_left] => [element_ratio] => [element_ratio_lock] => 1 [natural_width] => 200 [natural_height] => 135 [natural_ratio] => [style_enabled] => 1 [style] => clear [caption_enabled] => 1 [caption_text] => [alt_enabled] => 1 [alt_text] => [link_enabled] => 1 [link_url] => [link_title] => [link_target] => [popup_enabled] => 1 [popup_url] => [popup_uri] => [popup_variation] => [custom_css] => ) [blocks] => Array ( ) [nested] => 1 [isolated] => [style] => width: auto; [text] => undefined [editableHtml] => [position] => right ) 1 We're looking forward to working closely with the BKPA, and really appreciate their continued support for Shared Care. For more information on the BKPA activities, please see their website.
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