Micks Story

Read Micks Story here.    Download PDF File Here

Orlando's Story

Orlando speaks below about his experience as a patient doing Shared Care and then moving onto Home Haemodialysis.

Why do Home Haemodialysis?

Paul Swift, a home haemodialysis patient from Australia, discusses his experiences of home haemodialysis. 

Staying Safe on Home Haemodialysis

As it should be and as it really is. 

How to Button Hole an AV Fistula

My name is Pauline, dialysis access nurse in York Hospital, UK. In this short video I will show you how to buttonhole a fistula. 

Going Home With a Dialysis Machine: It’s Like ‘Learning to Drive’

What's it like starting out on home haemodialysis (HHD)? A team in London have been visiting HHD patients and their families to better understand their experiences of HHD. Their focus has been on how the design of the haemodialysis machine helps or hinders patients and carers, and how people stay safe at home. Although every individual and family is different, and may have received different training and be using any one of several different machines, there were many common themes that emerged across all 19 participating families. 

Kidney Health Australia Home Dialysis Newsletters

For Health Professionals and those affected by kidney disease. 

My Journey onto Nocturnal Dialysis

My name is Marianne Hawes and I have been a haemodialysis patient for eighteen and a half years. I have experienced three renal units, as a resident patient, in that time, in different parts of the country.

Alison's Story

Shared Haemodialysis Care is radically improving health outcomes for kidney patients in Yorkshire and the Humber. Thanks to an innovative project developed in conjunction with patients from across our region and sponsored by The Health Foundation and NHS Kidney Care, 90% of 1800 patients are now actively participating in their own haemodialysis treatment. 

A History of Haemodialysis Care in Yorkshire

Haemodialysis treatment, initially only for patients with reversible acute kidney injury, was pioneered in three sites in the United Kingdom in the 1950s, one of which was in Yorkshire at the Leeds General Infirmary. The treatment then became available for people with kidney failure which was not going to recover, initially cited at the big hospitals in Leeds, Sheffield and Hull. Subsequently kidney units were established in the hospitals in Bradford and York and more recently Doncaster. As well as the six main unit renal dialysis centres in these cities, there are 20 satellite dialysis units which were opened to serve local communities and reduce the need for patients to travel long distances for treatment. These units serve from Skipton in the West to Scarborough in the North East, Grimsby in the East and Chesterfield the most southerly. The geographical area covered is West Yorkshire, North Yorkshire, the East Riding of Yorkshire, South Yorkshire, along with North Lincolnshire, and patients travel from the adjoining regions particularly Darbyshire and Bassetlaw.